An Open Endorsement of War with North Korea

By PATRICK WOOD

I’m no hawk. I opposed military action in Syria and Libya and call myself a progressive humanitarian with respect for international law and norms.

I am completely convinced that going to war with North Korea to depose the Kim regime is the right thing to do for the world as a whole.

North Korea is desperately trying to pose a larger threat to the international community than it currently does. Its current floundering and almost comical attempts to intimidate the rest of the world with missile launches and bomb tests, most of which fail, is a temporary stage. Given enough time, North Korea will discover how to use its arsenal successfully.

It would be wise to quash this menace in its infancy. The North Korean regime has given ample justification for its destruction, including direct threats to South Korea and the United States, as well as humanitarian justifications by starving and killing their own people. North Korea’s neglect of its own people is so extreme and the malnutrition of its own people is so severe that we are beginning to see human beings born in the country develop smaller statures to compensate for the lack of nutritional intake. While this is a fascinating glimpse at human evolution and adaptation, the cause and effect of this change is quite grim. On average, North Korean men are already an entire 3.25 inches shorter than South Koreans. North Korean males born today will attain an average height of only 5’2″, earning this generation the nickname “The Stunted Generation.”

North Korea has admitted to placing members of its population in labor camps. Refugees reveal that their crimes, notably escaping the country, will subject three generations of their family to death or imprisonment in a labor camp. The Kim regime has taken authoritarianism as well as restriction on freedom of thought and expression to a twisted high.

When North Korea allows foreign nationals to visit, these tourists are typically only allowed to see Pyongyang and are accompanied on any excursions by a government minder. The U.S. State Department warns that the government has subjected Americans to “arbitrary arrests and long-term detention,” but Americans are still technically allowed to visit and generally avoid trouble as long as they follow all the rules.

Pyongyang may be the only city in North Korea where starvation isn’t completely rampant. Of course, if the Kim regime doesn’t like you or your family, you don’t get to live in Pyongyang.

After World War II and the Holocaust, an international principle called R2P (“Responsibility to Protect”) was articulated. The objective was not to allow a genocide like the Holocaust to occur again.

Admittedly, the actions of the North Korean regime may not meet the strict definition of genocide (some definitions exclude anything less than an attempt to completely exterminate a demographic group), but the similarities to a genocidal regime are apparent and in my view strong enough to invoke the principle of R2P.

Hundreds of thousands of North Koreans have died or are dying of starvation due to the government’s unwillingness to concentrate on feeding its people. Labor camps, resembling concentration camps, are operating in North Korea, and political critics and their families are being butchered by the state without so much as a trial.

The safety and security of North Korea and the world depends on the toppling of the Kim regime. The American government, frequently speaking through Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Vice President Mike Pence, has done a lot of posturing and line-drawing on this issue recently. Mike Pence has warned North Korea that “the sword stands ready.”

For the sake of “The Stunted Generation” and the world, I hope we are one missile test away from the sword swinging.

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